Picture 15

Some interesting survivalist images:

Picture 15

Image by bionicteaching

Tarahumara Chia

Image by John and Anni
If you use any of our photos, in any way, you must give credit to "Homestead and Gardens" by using a link that directs to www.homesteadandgardens.com.
Tarahumara Chia (Salvia tiliafolia), also known as Lindenleaf Sage, produces an edible seed that swells up when in water, producing a gel.
The Chia seeds that most people get at health food and survivalist type stores likely come from Salvia hispanica. The two plants (S. hispanica and S. tiliifolia) are related and both produce an edible seed that creates a gel when added to water.

Tarahumara Chia

Image by John and Anni
If you use any of our photos, in any way, you must give credit to "Homestead and Gardens" by using a link that directs to www.homesteadandgardens.com.
These Tarahumara Chia plants were damaged by Round-Up drift. They were being grown in a greenhouse about 60-80 feet from a soybean field, and the field was sprayed one day when the wind was just a little too strong and the fans pulled some of the Round-Up into the greenhouse.
Tarahumara Chia (Salvia tiliafolia), also known as Lindenleaf Sage, produces an edible seed that swells up when in water, producing a gel.
The Chia seeds that most people get at health food and survivalist type stores likely come from Salvia hispanica. The two plants (S. hispanica and S. tiliifolia) are related and both produce an edible seed that creates a gel when added to water.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *